‘Every morning was like Russian roulette.’ They have been able to recover from covid, but problems persist in many patients iROZHLAS

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The coronavirus disease, which first appeared in China late last year, has cured eight million people worldwide. However, scientific studies and the experience of those who have undergone covidem-19 themselves suggest that even after a cure proven by a negative test, many patients will not have their health problems. Fatigue, dizziness, headaches and many other problems persist for weeks or even months, even with mild disease.




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However, scientific studies and the experience of those who have undergone covidem-19 themselves suggest that even after a cure proven by a negative test, many patients will not have their health problems | Source: Reuters

Prior to the coronavirus infection, 36-year-old businesswoman Genevieve Danesi said she was in good shape. She went to the doctor once a year, did not smoke, played sports twice a week. Now everything is different.


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A businesswoman from the French city of Antibes has heard from doctors many times that she is young, and if she is ill, she should stay at home. She was sent to the hospital for a lung CT in the hospital up to a month after she developed her first symptoms. The examination showed that she probably suffered from covid-19.

Even a few weeks after the outbreak, she did not feel well. Due to dizziness and fast heartbeat, she was unable to stand for more than five minutes. “From the beginning until about the 70th day, it was like yo-yo old and new symptoms. Every morning was like Russian roulette, “Danesi describes for the server Euronews.

Her condition only improved after the doctors gave her home oxygen treatment. To this day, however, she is taking medication to prevent her resting heart rate from exceeding 120 beats per minute. At the same time, scientific studies show that the case of a 36-year-old French woman is far from unique.

Brain damage and other problems

One of these researches is a study by Italian experts published last week in the medical field JAMA magazine, which followed the condition of 143 coronavirus infections aged 19 to 84 years. They were all hospitalized in the hospital and were able to recover from the disease. However, in a total of 87 percent of them, at least one of the symptoms persists, most often fatigue and shortness of breath.


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“We know that there are a number of people who become infected with the virus – whether severe or less severe – and who have symptoms for several weeks,” French Health Minister Olivier Véran said in a recent interview.

He also points to the persisting problems in some cured patients study experts from University College London last week, according to which coronavirus can cause serious neurological complications in patients, including brain damage.

This conclusion was reached after examining 43 patients aged 16 to 85 years who showed milder and more severe forms of the disease. In some, they found a stroke, transient cerebral dysfunction and delirium, as well as a rare disease called acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) – an autoimmune disease of the brain or spinal cord that occurs after acute viral diseases.

There are no Czech statistics

Foreign studies do not escape the attention of Czech experts who care for patients with coronavirus. However, Martin Balík, chief physician at the Department of Anaesthesiology, Resuscitation and Intensive Care of the General University Hospital in Prague, notes that the extent of neurological problems in patients with covid-19 in the Czech Republic is not completely known – given that there was de facto no pandemic in the Czech Republic. and the capacity of hospitals had reserves even during the peak of the spread of the virus, there are no Czech statistics.


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“We treat our patients we treat comprehensively. We know that the problems are there, but we do not yet have Czech national statistics and I do not know whether it is necessary to do them, because data from foreign databases, where there were many more patients, show that there may be neurological sanctions. And it is quite logical why. Because the coronavirus affects the vascular wall, “Balík tells iROZHLAS.cz.

“The formation of microprecipitates can affect coronaviruses that are functionally dependent on an extensive capillary network and blood flow to the organs. And that includes the central nervous system, “he describes and adds that these problems can therefore be related to circulatory disorders of the nervous system. Due to the inflammation of the vascular wall, which can occur in connection with the coronavirus infection, according to him, the chance of a stroke also increases.

“In the patients we treated, and there were about 75 of them, we did not see severe strokes and neurological symptoms such as stroke in the acute phase. But we cannot rule out the possibility that patients will not feel completely well after discharge after prolonged follow-up. They may still be diagnosed with some neurological symptoms, “adds Balík.

The doctors did not take the problem seriously

A few weeks old Spanish also warns of neurological problems associated with coronavirus infection study, which is pointed out in the daily El País. “The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 attacks the respiratory system, but there is growing evidence that it also has an impact on the nervous system,” the Spanish daily writes.


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The June study to which the paper refers examined the neurological status of a total of 841 coronavirus patients from two hospitals in Albacete, southeastern Spain. A total of 57 percent of them had neurological problems. Most often (17%) it was myalgia, ie muscle pain, but also headache, dizziness or attention deficit.

Nathalie Nury, a 51-year-old fine arts teacher from Nîmes in southern France, also suffered from dizziness for a long time. He began to feel fever, shortness of breath, chest pain and general exhaustion at the end of March, as he describes for Euronews. Shortly before that, her son returned from Paris with her friend, who lost their sense of smell and taste.

Nury’s initial symptoms lasted for about ten days, but she did not undergo the coronavirus test – at that time, the tests were said to be reserved only for hospitalized patients with coronavirus and for healthcare professionals. She felt tired throughout April, then chest pain and fever returned in early May.

“I was completely lost, my loved ones didn’t understand it at all,” says the 51-year-old Frenchwoman. According to her, the symptoms, including dizziness, returned in cycles for several months, so she visited a number of doctors, but some did not take her problems seriously. Now he is trying to help people with similar problems – he is in contact with them on social networks, where people share their experiences.

‘Postcovide syndrome’

Fiona Lowenstein is also trying to help people with long-term symptoms of the disease. She has set up a support group for patients with covid-19 called Body Politic.

After becoming infected with coronavirus in March and hospitalized with fever and shortness of breath in hospital, doctors told her to return if her symptoms worsened. Instead of feeling better, her symptoms kept coming back in the following weeks.


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“It’s a blow to your ego – being around twenty, you’re healthy and active, then you get infected and you think you’ll be better soon and you’ll be fine. And then it won’t work out, “she described her experience for the diary The Guardian.

Due to the persisting problems in some patients now according to British BBC some experts discuss whether the so-called “postcovide syndrome” should not be recognized as a disease in itself. According to them, such a step could help diagnose and treat patients in whom health complications persist even after healing.

At the same time, doctors warn that the “mild” course of the disease or the relatively young age of the patient does not mean that he will return to normal life in the same state of health as before.

“It’s not the best thing to say that you’re fine, because you’re from a younger age group – go out and get infected. Because initial evidence suggests that in the event of covid-19, post-viral syndrome may overwhelm you, and recovery may take a long time, ”warns the newspaper. The Telegraph expert of the British University of Exeter Bharat Pankhania.

Eliška Kubátová

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